Home Safety Council – the leading source for home safety tips, checklists and information about home fire safety, falls prevention, poison prevention, water safety, child safety, disaster preparedness as well as many other home safety topics.

This site covers all I ever wanted to cover on my site. 

Home Safety Council – the leading source for home safety tips, checklists and information about home fire safety, falls prevention, poison prevention, water safety, child safety, disaster preparedness as well as many other home safety topics..

I will keep mine open for those who want to make comments and discuss safety items.

For teens, too many hours online correlates with risky behavior | Deseret News

http://www.deseretnews.com/mobile/article/700131273/For-teens-too-many-hours-online-correlates-with-risky-behavior.html

Internet Usage Helps for Members

Here are some helpful suggestions for keeping your family safe while using the Internet, Web, or other electronics.

* Place computers in commonly used areas of the home.

* If you use e-mail or social media sites, consider establishing accounts on a family basis, rather than for each individual.

* Actively monitor website access to help family members remain safe.

* Discuss Internet and media safety with children from an early age.

* Be alert and aware of media that enters the home through computers, mobile media players, and mobile phones.  

* Kids should know that any electronics are subject to random inspections by parents at any time.  They should also know that these electronics can be confinscated if deamed necissary.

* Share full access or passwords to private e-mail and social media sites with your spouse and have children share it with parents.

via Internet Usage Helps for Members.

Internet and Mobile Safety

Here are some helpful suggestions for keeping your family safe while using the Internet, Web, or other electronics.

* Place computers in commonly used areas of the home.

* Learn and Discuss what secure web sites look like and how to verify their security.

* If you use e-mail or social media sites, consider establishing accounts on a family basis, rather than for each individual.

* Actively monitor website access to help family members remain safe.

* Discuss Internet and media safety with children from an early age.

* Be alert and aware of media that enters the home through computers, mobile media players, and mobile phones.  

* Kids should know that any electronics are subject to random inspections by parents at any time.  They should also know that these electronics will be confiscated, if deemed necessary.

* Share full access or passwords to private e-mail and social media sites with your spouse and have children share it with parents.

Home Electrical Safety Tips – State Farm

To prevent such damage, consider using lightning protection systems and surge protection devices and investing in Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCIs), and follow some general prevention tips.

Where do electrical surges come from?

Electrical surges happen in storms when:

  1. Electric utility lines touch one another
  2. Power grid switching occurs
  3. Air conditioning units, furnaces, refrigerators or vacuum cleaners turn on and off.
  4. Lightning strikes within two miles of a home
  5. 

Lightning Protection Systems

  1. Provide a direct path for the lightning to follow to the ground
  2. Prevent destruction, damage, injury or death as it travels that path
  3. 

When there is lightning nearby:

  1. Do not use the telephone except in an emergency.
  2. Stay away from electrical appliances, TVs, fireplaces, metal objects, windows or doors.
  3. Seek shelter immediately in an enclosed building or vehicle.
  4. If you cannot find shelter, find a low lying area, crouch down with feet together and hands on your knees until the storm is over.
  5. Avoid isolated trees, high ground, bodies of water or large open areas.

If someone is injured, administer first aid, if you are qualified to do so, and call for emergency help. You cannot be shocked by someone who has been hit by lightning.

Surge Protection Devices

Properly installed surge protection devices (SPDs), combined with a good grounding system, should protect your electronic and electrical appliances from all but the most severe electrical surges. An SPD does not suppress or arrest a surge; it actually diverts the surge to the ground.

Each time a surge occurs, the damage to the electronic or electrical appliance accumulates, weakening the appliance components until they finally fail.

Things to consider when looking for SPDs:

  1. The surge protector should be listed to UL Standard 1449.
  2. The surge protector must be capable of protecting all power and signal lines that are connected to the protected equipment.  Examples of signal lines: phone lines and coaxial cable from satellite, cable TV or external antenna.
  3. Select a surge protector that has an indicating light and/or audible alarm to show when it needs replacement.
  4. Look for SPDs that come with a manufacturer’s warranty. Some warranties cover only the device; others also cover the damaged equipment and electrical wire insulation chewed by rodents.

via Home Electrical Safety Tips – State Farm.

Home Electrical Safety Tips – State Farm

Home Electrical Safety Tips – State Farm.

Daisey Chaines

No these are not flowers although they could spark like flowers if one is created out of Surge Protectors.
Where I work, we do a yearly risk survey or audit. Over the past 4 years we have been trying to teach our employees not to plug a surge protector into another surge protector. Finally, this year, they seem to have grasped the consept.
Some may ask what is wrong with plugging a surge protecor into another surge protector (“Daisey Chain”)? Well the best way I can put it is that two negatives make a posotive and thus the surge protection doesn’t work. They cancel each other out. All of the equipment that was plugged into the surge protectors might as well have been plugged into the wall. If you need more length, buy a surge protector that has a longer cord.

7 Steps to Earthquake Safety

This is a great link for those who live around a fault.

http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/2005/15/#steps

Walking on water is not recommended

Water Walking Balls are not popular with the Consumer Product Safety Commission. This article by msnbc tells why and the dangers surrounding this new rage.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42355628/ns/business-us_business/

Literacy is a safety issue

Low health literacy in older Americans is linked to poorer health status and a higher risk of death, according to a new evidence report by HHS’ Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

Adults with limited literacy may find it difficult to read or understand critical fire safety information. Without this information, these adults and their families are at a greater risk for loss, injury, or death due to fire.

http://www.proliteracy.org/keystosafety/index.asp